Research

National Research Agenda

In 2011, 320 children from across Uganda participated in a consultation on the nature of childhood in the country. Drawn from urban and rural areas in the south, north, east and west, children shared their hopes as they described what they saw ‘doing well’ as a child to mean. Over 150 parents, from the same communities, indicated their own aspirations for their children as they too described what they saw as marking those children who were ‘doing well’. The findings suggest some key characteristics defining children’s well-being in contemporary Uganda, which should shape national approaches to child protection. The consultation also revealed important differences in the perspectives of children and parents, and in expectations of boys and girls, that inform work in promoting children’s well-being across the nation.

Ongoing research

africhild child rights abuse policy in Africa Uganda

1

A randomized control trial of enhanced child friendly space interventions for girls and boys affected by conflict and displacement

africhild child rights abuse policy in Africa Uganda

2

Rights Based Approach to HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment and Adolescents’ Access and Utilization.

3

Children’s Experiences and Perspectives on Parental and Community Involvement in their Schooling.

africhild child rights abuse policy in Africa Uganda

4

Evaluating Cultural Appropriateness of the Integrated Behavioral Model on Sanitation and Hygiene Outcomes among Pupils in Public Primary Schools in Mukono Municipality.

africhild child rights abuse policy in Africa Uganda

5

The effect of child labour on the education and health of children working in stone quarries in south-western Uganda.

africhild child rights abuse policy in Africa Uganda

6

Child labour and learning outcomes in fishing communities in West Nile, Uganda.

africhild child rights abuse policy in Africa Uganda

7

Promoting School Retention in Busoga Primary Schools: Voices of Children On the Role of Parents

africhild child rights abuse policy in Africa Uganda

8

Child Poverty Antecedents and Adolescence Growth in Post War Northern Uganda.

Completed research studies

The effect of COVID19 on the wellbeing of children in Uganda

The global COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the way we live and
work, but most critically it amplified the vulnerabilities of children and
inequities that are inherent within our communities. The government-
imposed strict prevention measures impacted the livelihoods of many
working people, hindered access to essential services like healthcare
and education. Over 15 million children in Uganda were out of school
without the protection net that schools provide.
The global COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the way we live and
work, but most critically it amplified the vulnerabilities of children and
inequities that are inherent within our communities. The government-
imposed strict prevention measures impacted the livelihoods of many
working people, hindered access to essential services like healthcare
and education. Over 15 million children in Uganda were out of school
without the protection net that schools provide.
Anecdotal and media reports in Uganda suggest that the confinement
of the population at home and in their communities resulted in a sharp
rise in cases of domestic violence, child abuse, teenage pregnancy,
sexual exploitation, child labour among others. This put into sharp focus
the work of institutions like AfriChild and the need for strategies to
ensure child protection amidst not only the global COVID-19 pandemic,
but also the hidden crisis of child abuse escalated by the pandemic.

The AfriChild Centre is committed to generation of research evidence
to ensure relevant policies for children in Africa. The COVID-19 pandemic
and the subsequent government lock-down response is unprecedented.
This situation demanded empirical evidence to provide a basis for
informed action. In line with its mission, the AfriChild Centre conducted
a scientific study to generate evidence on the effect of COVID-19 on
the wellbeing of children in Uganda. This study was premised on the
emerging challenges presented by the pandemic including; limited,
inaccurate, inappropriate and non-inclusive information on COVID-19,
possible escalation of violence against children leading to increased
pressure on the already limited social protection services.

Other potential adverse effects to children include mental stress caused by
loss or separation from primary caregivers, lack of adequate access
to protection, health and education services, disruption in livelihoods
and family connections, fear and anxiety as well as increased domestic
violence in the home.

The ultimate purpose of this study report is to provide lessons for all
stakeholders from the country’s experience of the pandemic as a basis
to strengthen our health, education, economic and social protection
systems; through informed policy and programming to better respond
to the current and future pandemics, especially as relates to the
protection and well-being of our children.

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